<div class="wsite-youtube" style="margin-bottom:10px;margin-top:10px;"><div class="wsite-youtube-wrapper wsite-youtube-size-auto wsite-youtube-align-center"> <div class="wsite-youtube-container"> <iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Dn88cx9Mqx0?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </div> </div></div> <div class="paragraph" style="text-align:center;">I've had two babies and trained hundreds of clients, but had <em>never</em> heard about diastasis recti until a friend mentioned it recently. <br><br>I had noticed since having my second baby that my resting stomach position had more of a bloated look, almost like I'm 3 or 4 months pregnant all of the time. I mean, I can "suck" it in but the resting position seemed a bit abnormal for me. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvybTZiLqRE" style="" title="">I checked to see if I had it,</a> and sure enough, my abs had a 2 finger separation all the way up to my rib cage. <br><br>In addition to the tummy pooch, my core muscles were the weakest I could ever remember. I tried to do a pushup at 2 months postpartum and fell flat on my face as my core muscles were completely "gone." My arms could have done some pushups, but it felt like I had no core to help me, and without a core, pushups aren't happening. <br><br>I began to research everything I could about diastasis recti - learning everything possible about how to heal it through exercise, what makes the condition worse, and what happens if its not dealt with. <br><br>Why is DR that not being talked about more in the world of women's fitness? <span style="background-color: transparent;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;">Why are we not teaching women how to engage the core and pelvic floor as one unit during our workouts? Why are women still doing crunches two months postpartum even though it is causing more harm than good? Why are we doing jump rope and running when it causes us to "leak?" </span></span><br><span style="background-color: transparent;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;"><br></span></span><br><span style="background-color: transparent;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;"><strong>There's nothing cool about doing a workout that is causing your body more hard them good.</strong></span></span><br><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em; background-color: transparent;"><br></span><br><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em; background-color: transparent;">You <em>can</em> build up to the intense workouts you are craving, but in the mean time, take care of your body and do workouts that build your muscles up instead of further tearing them down.</span><br><br><span style="background-color: transparent;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;">This is not just about how your </span>abs<span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;"> <em>look; </em>it's about them being strong and functional for everyday normal activities and preventing conditions like a hernia, chronic low back pain, and SI joint dysfunction. Nobody wants a hernia, but women get them all of the time from leaving diastasis recti untreated. </span></span><br><br>Your body functions as a unit, not as individual parts. You can't just do a bunch of crunches and expect a six-pack to pop out a month later. It's about teaching the core and pelvic floor to operate together during each and every exercise you do throughout your day. <br><br>For example, when you pick up your chunky baby or do a squat, do you think about lifting your pelvic floor and engaging your lower core muscles as you exhale and stand up? If not, it's something to start consciously thinking about during your workouts and everyday activities. <br><br>Just remember, on the concentric, or "hard" portion of the exercise, (i.e. pushing up the barbell on bench press or the upward motion of the squat) you should be exhaling, engaging the core, and "drawing" up the pelvic floor as if you're trying to hold urine.<span style="background-color: transparent;"><span style="letter-spacing: 0.02em; line-height: 1.5em;"><br></span></span> </div> <div class="wsite-youtube" style="margin-bottom:10px;margin-top:10px;"><div class="wsite-youtube-wrapper wsite-youtube-size-auto wsite-youtube-align-center"> <div class="wsite-youtube-container"> <iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/30G3BQ3oLFA?wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> </div> </div></div> <div class="paragraph" style="text-align:center;"> <br><strong style="">W</strong><strong style="">hat should I be avoiding if I have DR?</strong><br><br><span style="">To start, </span><em style="">stop</em><span style=""> doing crunches. Yep, every single one of them. Think about this for a second. Your rectus abdominal muscles should have little to no gap as they are the main support and framework for your organs. When they are separated, the muscles don't support things as they should and exercises like the crunch cause the organs to bulge forward, worsening your gap. </span><br><br><span style="">The same thing goes for pushups, planks, squats, etc. If you aren't able to brace your core muscles and if you feel like you are pushing or "tenting" your abs out during a move, it means your core does not have adequate strength for that exercise yet. It's something I try to walk each of my clients through so they are able to judge if any exercises are too much for them at that time. </span><br><br><span style="">Pushups and planks can be modified by coming on to your knees or elevating your hands to a couch or wall. This significantly reduces the load on your core and you can graduate to a regular pushup or plank overtime as your core gets stronger. </span><br><br><strong style="">So what exercises <em style="">should</em> I be doing to heal my gap?</strong><br><br><strong style="">Ones that engage your transverse abdominis muscle (TVA), the deep muscles of your core. </strong><br><br><span style="">. You TVA muscles are the stabilizers for many, many exercises, and if you engage them correctly as you exhale, this is what helps to knit the core muscles back together over time. It's not a quick fix, just like anything worth while does not happen overnight. </span><br><br><span style="">Single leg squats, planks with leg lifts, or any single-leg balance poses force the deep abdominal muscles to be used as stabilizers, helping to draw the two muscles back together. Focusing on these types of exercises 3-4 days per week is a great way to begin to restore the core muscles and draw them back together. </span><br><br><span style="">Have you experienced DR after a labor? What has helped you? Please let us know your experience in the comments below! </span> </div>

Comment